NYT: They Work Long Hours, but What About Results?

Our summary: generally spending time is mistaken for efficiency.  Cut down on meetings, focus on metrics, expectations, and outcomes.  You shouldn’t need to stay late or work on weekends to be efficient.  The last part of the article has a significant overlap with setting up expectations on when using the FairSetup model.

 

They Work Long Hours, but What About Results?
By ROBERT C. POZEN
Published: October 6, 2012

IT’S 5 p.m. at the office. Working fast, you’ve finished your tasks for the day and want to go home. But none of your colleagues have left yet, so you stay another hour or two, surfing the Web and reading your e-mails again, so you don’t come off as a slacker.

It’s an unfortunate reality that efficiency often goes unrewarded in the workplace. I had that feeling a lot when I was a partner in a Washington law firm. Because of my expertise, I could often answer a client’s questions quickly, saving both of us time. But because my firm billed by the hour, as most law firms do, my efficiency worked against me. Continue reading

HBR Blog: Case of Performance-based Compensation at a Restaurant

Our Summary: A post on HBR covers a case where performance-based compensation was deployed at a restaurant.  The system tracks waitstaff performance in terms of customer sales and tips.  It then adjusts scheduling to reward top performers.

This deployment is considered a success with a 2-3% increase in revenues.

Get Employees to Compete Against Each Other
by Serguei Netessine and Valery Yakubovich

By using technology to create a form of the leaderboard typical in sales organizations, innovative firms are infusing their workplaces with competitive spirit. Both companies and high-performing employees stand to gain. We call these firms “winners take all” organizations.

Continue reading